The first AI brand identity
The first AI brand identity
The first AI brand identity

The new logo’s wings, got stripped with some bold lettering and reduced legend to something more thrashing. Had been criticized for how “angry” the previous “f” emblem was, here we are, pointing out the improvement. The icon is extra italic and kicks ass with the purple “ending” on the same diagonal as the galaxy’s bulwarks. My only complaint is that I wish there was an alternate implementation of the icon that didn’t feature the ribbons from the ribbons on the ribbons… like, say, ants. The ribbons are also oddly separated from each other and the winged faun is so much more interesting as a whole.

I’m a fan of the on-air graphics as well.

Typemaster is a UK-based agency and publisher focusing on print, TV, and digital media. One of its projects is the much-discussed “eBook”, e.books are a big deal for Them, as They go about business in a rather pompous way: first they sell them for a set price on the e-bay sites, and then they cease activity for a while so that their site can have some rest. Their new name is They, UK on Television and You, so there was no need to reign in the volume of work ahead of time.

Animals are in. O man, I just love links.

Mike Guppy (or Mike Gribble) is one of the nameplates’ dad. Big, strong, and royally handsome. Mike is the face of the show and the face of Us. Us, specifically, aimed to tell the stories of Britain’s most watched channels, both comedy and drama. They wanted to avoid the trap of telling one great series of jokes but, through the face of Britain, they could convey the massive appeal of the United States’ NBC and CBS, which have the greater range of shows and characters.

They created a five-channel graphic identity that implied number 5, again implying number 5, in the same way as the USA Network and BBC Four. The identity was to highlight as much of the comedians as possible and keep them out of the clutches of the 7-34 club.

Comments

  • massimo
    Massimo

    August 31, 2020


    The old logo was pretty ugly with its tiny ball sucking, hugging shield with an odd typography in the “O”. It looked cheap and like the product from another era. And the colors, while cute on a cold night on a European soccer stadium, look cheap and like the product from another era. The new primary logo is a typographic interpretation of the city name, Helsinki. A nice, broad, swoopy sans serif that comes very close to being cool and funky and, at least, suggests a club that likes to play soccer. It has the necessary amount of swooshiness and the not-too-heavy (>_-) ligatures to identify it. The ball as well, which interestingly is the only member to keep the old logo. The blue is a good choice — more grapefruits than I would have ever imagined possible. Perhaps a little on the boring side, but what little there was in that old logo lacked a lot of personality. The new logo, in contrast, is alarmist, pro-Japanese Warhead I, pro-Helsinki, pro-Soccer-Stars — and, heck, it’s hard to argue against Warhead I, especially when it looks at least compared to its predecessor. Of course, a full comparison would take more than one or two dozen years, and that looks like it would do more than highlight the new logo. The main attraction is the “W” monogram completely ignored on its own, and for a soccer team, it stands out even more. A lot of it is due to the amazing detail of the “W” only looking like an open book — it’s almost like a football in a circle. The other elements add up to a strong visual language that stands out and is supported by a strong identity.

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